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DEPRESSION

What Is Depression?

Many of us may feel unhappy from time to time, but it doesn't typically last very long. Some call it being blue, sad, or miserable. For some of us, though, depression interferes with our everyday lives and is long lasting. 

This type of depression is a mental state of depressed mood and we feel perpetuating frustration, anger, despair, loss, discouragement, or sadness.

The most common approach to treat clinical depression is psychotherapy by a licensed therapist. In some cases, medications are used in tandem with counseling.

Wicks Psychological Therapists use Cognitive Behavioral Therapy techniques where clients learn how to modify and control their unproductive thinking patterns to ultimately produce more healthy behaviors.

Individuals feel depressed at times. Difficult life situations can lead a person to feel scared, sad, lonely, or anxious.  These feelings are normal reactions to life’s stressors.

But some people experience these feelings daily or nearly daily for no apparent reason, making it difficult to carry on with normal, everyday

functioning. These people may have an anxiety disorder, depression, or both.

It is not uncommon for someone with an anxiety disorder to also suffer from depression or vice versa. Nearly one-half of those diagnosed with depression are also diagnosed with an anxiety disorder.

How Is

Depression

Treated?

Depression

Good News

The good news is that these disorders are both treatable, separately and together. Depression is a condition in which a person feels discouraged, sad, hopeless, unmotivated, or disinterested in life in general. When these feelings last for a short period of time, it may be a case of "the blues."

But when such feelings last for more than two weeks and when the feelings interfere with daily activities such as taking care of family, spending time with friends, or going to work or school, it's likely a major depressive episode.

Major depression is a treatable illness that affects the way a person thinks, feels, behaves, and functions. Depression is one of the most common mental disorders in the United States.  At any point in time, 3 to 5 percent of adults suffer from major depression. As many as 2 out of 100 young children and 8 out of 100 teens may have serious depression.

At any point in time, 3 to 5 percent of adults suffer from major depression.
As many as 2 out of 100 young children and 8 out
of 100 teens may have
serious depression.

Types of Depression

Three main types of depressive disorders—major depression, persistent depressive disorder, and bipolar disorder—can occur with any of the anxiety disorders.

Major depression involves at least five of the symptoms for a two-week period. Such an episode is disabling and will interfere with the ability to work, study, eat, and sleep. Major depressive episodes may occur once or twice in a lifetime, or they may recur frequently.

 

They may also take place spontaneously, during or after the loss of a loved one, a relationship breakup, a serious illness, or other life event. Some people with major depression may feel that life is not worth living and some will attempt to end their lives.

Persistent depressive disorder, or PDD, (formerly called dysthymia) is a form of depression that usually continues for at least two years. Although it is less severe than major depression. It involves the same symptoms as major depression, mainly low energy, poor appetite or overeating, and insomnia or oversleeping.

 

It can manifest as stress, irritability, and mild anhedonia, which is the inability to derive pleasure from most activities. People with PDD might be thought of as always seeing the glass as half empty.

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Bipolar disorder, also known as manic-depressive illness, is a brain disorder that causes unusual shifts in a person's mood, energy, and ability to function.

The mood episodes associated with the disorder persist from days to weeks or longer, and can be dramatic, with periods of being overly high and/or irritable to periods of persistent sadness and hopelessness.

Severe changes in behavior go along with the mood changes. These periods of highs and lows, called episodes of mania and depression, can be distinct episodes often recurring over time, or they may occur together in a so-called mixed state. Often people with bipolar disorder experience periods of normal mood in between mood episodes.

Bipolar disorder, once called manic-depression, is characterized by a mood cycle that shifts from severe highs (mania) or mild highs (hypomania) to severe lows (depression).

During the manic phase, a person may experience abnormal or excessive elation, irritability, a decreased need for sleep, grandiose notions, increased talking, racing thoughts, increased sexual desire, markedly increased energy, poor judgment, and inappropriate social behavior.

CONTACT US
 
Wicks Psychological Services
 (402) 339 - 7991 
6550 South 84th 

Suite 300 
Omaha, NE  68127
office@wickspsych.com

F Y I

COUNSELING
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Individuals
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CONTACT US
 
Wicks Psychological Services
 (402) 339 - 7991 
6550 South 84th 

Suite 300 
Omaha, NE  68127
office@wickspsych.com
HOME
CREDENTIALS
Dr. Patricia Wicks
Rod Burger
Chris Wicks
Christopher Ihle
HOME
CREDENTIALS
Dr. Patricia Wicks
Rod Burger
Chris Wicks
Christopher Ihle
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